Criminal Defense FAQ

As Cleveland Criminal Defense lawyers, we at Patituce & Associates often talk to clients who have questions about Ohio Criminal Defense laws and how to fight the charges against them. This page answers some of the most frequently asked Criminal Defense questions.

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How Much Does Your Firm Charge for Legal Representation?

While each case is associated with fairly standard fees, our team of experienced criminal defense attorneys provide our clients with favorable payment options to ensure they get the legal counsel necessary to help them obtain the most favorable results. Yet, we cannot calculate an exact fee until we review your case and determine all your legal options.

For instance, a client who is attempting to fight the criminal charges against him/her will be charged a different fee compared to a client who wishes to plead “no contest.” Before we get started on your case, you will know the up-front costs of our services and we will work with you to take care of our fees.

Is There Anything I Must Know About My Arrest?

The following are the most important things you need to know when you are arrest:

  • According to your Fifth Amendment right, you have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in court.
  • Properly identify yourself to authorities.
  • If you are falsely accused of a crime, adamantly deny such allegations.
  • Ask for your lawyer.
  • Clearly state that you wish to exercise your Fifth Amendment right to remain silent and inform law enforcement officials that you will cooperate with the investigation after consulting with your lawyer.

If your loved one has been arrested, please do not discuss the details of their case over the phone. All phone conversations are recorded and may lead to facing criminal charges of your own.

Frequently Asked Questions Criminal Defense - Patituce & Associates

Should I Answer Every Questions Law Enforcement Officials Ask Me?

No, you have the right to remain silent. However, you must provide your name and identifying information to the police.

Why Should I Exercise My Right to Remain Silent?

As we mentioned before, anything you say can and will be used against you before hiring a lawyer or stepping foot inside a courtroom. Although you may believe that this could be an opportunity to clear your name, you may mistakenly incriminate yourself.

If I Don’t Cooperate with the Police, Won’t They Be Angry?

Although officers may appear angry about your lack of cooperation, most of them understand and respect your right to remain silent. Keep in mind, even mere small talk can be used to get you to say something that may incriminate you, so avoid answering any type of question until your lawyer arrives. When you exercise your Fifth Amendment right, you must inform law enforcement officials that you are willing to cooperate with the investigation until your attorney is present.

What Should I Do If Law Enforcement Officials Ask to Speak to Me, My Spouse, or My Child?

Before you are arrested or charged with a crime, the police may ask you or your family to come in to speak to them. If this is the case, you need to call your lawyer first and ask him/her to either attend the meeting with you or advise you on what to do. At Patituce & Associates, LLC, we are available to accompany our clients to these interviews—but only if the interview is in their best interest.

What Should I Do If There are Officers at My Door with a Search Warrant?

Remember to always be polite to law enforcement officials, so avoid yelling, swearing, or otherwise making any statements. Politely ask them to present a copy of the search warrant they have and request a copy for yourself. If they don’t have a warrant, politely tell them you will reach out to your lawyer and let them know you will get back to them.

Don’t sign anything until you first consult with your lawyer. For the most part, when the police have a search warrant, they would already present the search warrant to you or have you arrested.

While I’m Being Questioned by the Police, Can They Lie to Me?

Yes. It is not uncommon for investigators to lie to you in order to get you to say something incriminating. For example, if you and another person were arrested at the same time, the police may lie and tell you that the other individual is going to blame the alleged offense on you if you don’t tell them your side of the story. Again, exercise your Fifth Amendment right and wait until your attorney is present before speaking to the police.

Criminal Defense FAQs - Patituce & Associates

Is Pleading “No Contest” a Good Idea?

This is not a good idea in most cases. The only plea you should enter is “not guilty” to give you an opportunity to hire a lawyer and assess all the evidence against you. In fact, it is imperative to obtain legal counsel as soon as you are arrested or learn that you are under criminal investigation.

Our legal team at Patituce & Associates, LLC can speak to the police officers in charge of your investigation, meet with the prosecutors who are handling your case, assess all the evidence against you, and provide an effective and personalized defense strategy to protect your rights and freedom throughout the legal process.

What Should I Do If the Police Promise to Help Me Out If I Agree to Work with Them?

You must understand that cooperating with law enforcement officials may not be in your best interests, especially if they need help arresting other individuals by asking you to make a transaction or wear a wire. We will gladly meet with the police on your behalf.

What Do I Do If I Learn that the Alleged Victim is Lying After Reading the Police Report?

Although you may feel compelled to tell your truth and defend yourself, you could possibly incriminate yourself in the process by giving the police too much detail. You need to hire a lawyer to immediately start defending you against such false allegations.

How Do I Schedule an Appointment with Patituce & Associates, LLC?

Call 440-471-7784 right away. You can meet us at our office outside of traditional times. For instance, you can either meet with us before work, in the evening after work, or on the weekend.

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